Epidemiology of stripe rust of wheat, 1961-1968

by Gregory Ellis Shaner

Publisher: Agricultural Experiment Station, Oregon State University in Corvallis

Written in English
Published: Pages: 31 Downloads: 294
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Subjects:

  • Stripe rust -- Epidemiology.,
  • Wheat -- Diseases and pests -- Epidemiology.

Edition Notes

Statement[Gregory Shaner and R.L. Poweson].
SeriesTechnical bulletin / Oregon State University, Agricultural Experiment Station -- 117., Technical bulletin (Oregon State University. Agricultural Experiment Station) -- 117.
ContributionsPowelson, R. L.
The Physical Object
Pagination31 p. :
Number of Pages31
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16091846M

Education Center. Advanced Topic. Ecology and Epidemiology in R. Disease Progress over Time. Stripe Rust Using the area under the disease progress curve to compare disease severity Emge, R.G. and Shrum, R.D. Epiphytology of Puccinia striiformis at five selected locations in Oregon during and Phytopathology Stripe rust lesion on wheat. Photo courtesy M. Nita. The wheat stripe rust pathogen (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici; Pst) was first detected in Australia in The features of the initial pathotype suggested that it was of European origin, and later work provided evidence that it was most likely transmitted as adherent spores on travellers’ clothing. Despite long-held views that this cool temperature pathogen would not adapt to. Chapter 1 discusses black stem rust of wheat in antiquity, and how its epidemics were perceived by the ancients. Chapter 2 reconstructs a forgotten epidemic of yellow stripe rust, , on rye, a staple food in Continental Europe. Chapter 3 describes the epidemics of potato late blight in Continental Europe, , that caused the Continental. Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has been long been regarded as a low-temperature disease and primarily problematic in cool, wet conditions.

  Effect of plot geometry on epidemic velocity of wheat yellow rust. Plant Pathology. ; – SAS Institute. SAS version SAS Institute; Cary, North Carolina, USA: Schneider DC. The rise of the concept of scale in ecology. BioScience. ; – Shaner G, Powelson RL. Epidemiology of stripe rust of wheat, Stripe rust resistance in wheat Race-specifi c resistance High-temperature adult-plant resistance Slow-rusting resistance Wheat stem rust Distribution and epidemiology Origin and historical importance Taxonomy, life cycle, and host range Genetic variation in Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici Stem rust. Wheat leaf rust is a fungal disease that affects wheat, barley and rye stems, leaves and grains. In temperate zones it is destructive on winter wheat because the pathogen ions can lead up to 20% yield loss, which is exacerbated by dying leaves, which fertilize the fungus. The pathogen is Puccinia rust fungus. Puccinia graminis causes "stem or black rust", P. triticina causes. Chen, X.M. Epidemiology and control of stripe rust [Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici] on wheat. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology. Chen, X.M. Epidemiology of barley stripe rust and races of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. hordei: the first decade in the United States.

Wheat [Triticum aestivum L. (Poaceae)] is the staple diet of people in Pakistan. It is attacked by many types of pests. Therefore the purpose of this study was to assess the impact of climate change on the ecology and epidemiology of various wheat pests in Punjab, Pakistan. Results indicate that maximum weeds hot spots (%) Phalaris minor, 45 (%) wild oat and (%) broad leaf.   Wheat is cultivated on an area of about million acres with production of million tonnes annually (PBS, ). Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici) is world-wide threat to wheat production, causing 10 to 70% grain losses depending on susceptibility of the cultivar, earliness of the initial infection, rate of disease development and duration of disease (Chen, ). Yellow (stripe) rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is a serious problem of wheat (Triticum aestivum) production in many parts of the world including pathogen is capable to produce new physiological races that attack resistant varieties and develop epidemic under optimal environmental conditions which results a serious yield loss.   Break-down of the Yr17 resistance to yellow rust of wheat in northern Europe-a case study by the yellow rust sub-group of COST Agronomie (in .

Epidemiology of stripe rust of wheat, 1961-1968 by Gregory Ellis Shaner Download PDF EPUB FB2

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Epidemiology of stripe rust of wheat, (Technical bulletin / Oregon State University, Agricultural Experiment Station)Author: Gregory Ellis Shaner. Epidemiology of Stripe Rust of Wheat, GREGORY SHANER and R. POWELSON ABSTRACT Epidemics of stripe rust occurred in Oregon during, and and continue to be a threat to wheat production.

The primary source of inoculum for epidemic development in the spring came from early-sown wheat that 1961-1968 book become infected the previous. This book comprehensively introduces stripe rust disease, its development and its integral control. Covering the biology, genetics, genome, and functional genomics of the pathogen, it also discusses host and non-host resistance, their interactions and the epidemiology of the disease.

It is intended. This book comprehensively introduces stripe rust disease, its development and its integrated control. Covering the biology, genetics, genome, and functional genomics of the pathogen, it also discusses host and non-host resistance, their interactions with the pathogen and the epidemiology of the disease.

Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. tritici, is one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. This review presents basic and recent information on the epidemiology Author: Xianming Chen. Abstract. Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis, is a polycyclic disease and its epidemic is mainly dependent upon the disease development gh the pathogen has a heteroecious macrocyclic lifecycle that consists of five spore stages, it almost completely reproduces asexually on its primary hosts of cereal crops and auxiliary hosts of wild grasses.

reports of stripe rust and its distribution around the world were given by Hassebrauk (), Stubbs (), Line (), and Li and Zeng (). Stripe rust of wheat has been reported in more than 60 countries and on all conti-nents except Antarctica. Research on the epidemiology and control of stripe rust has been conducted for more than a.

In the cereal group, wheat and barley are the principal hosts. Several wild grasses can harbor stripe rust pathogenic to wheat and barley; however, their role in the epidemiology of stripe rust differs from area to area. Environmental conditions are more critical for stripe rust than for other cereal rusts.

Stripe rust resistance in wheat breeding lines developed for central Shaanxi, an overwintering region for Puccinia striiformis f. tritici in China. Canadian Journal of. LING L. Epidemiology studies on stripe rust of wheat in Chengtu Plain, China.

Phytopathol MCGREGOR,A. & MANNERS, J. The effect of temperature and light intensity on growth and sporulation of Puccinia striiformis on wheat. Plant Pathol RAPILLY, F.

(t). Yellow rust epidemiology. Stripe rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. xtritici, is one of the most important diseases of wheat review presents basic and recent information on the epidemiology of stripe rust, changes in pathogen virulence and population structure, and movement of the pathogen in the United States and around the world.

Abstract This retrospective review deals with the sequence of events and research progress on control of stripe rust of wheat and barley in North America. From the discovery of stripe rust init documents the early years of stripe rust research, the year hiatus when stripe rust was not considered important and research was almost nonexistent, the short period in the s when stripe.

Stripe rust of wheat (Triticum aestivum), caused by Puccinia striiformis f. tritici, is highly affected by temperature, but the role of crop canopy temperature in stripe rust resistance is. Stripe rust of wheat, Puccinia striiformis f. tritici, was found to oversummer in the Sierra Nevada at altitudes of ft or above on wild grasses belonging to Elymus spp., Hordeum spp., and Sitanion spp.

The similarity of infection types of stripe rust isolates from various locations and hosts on a differential set of wheat cultivars suggests that only one race of P. striiformis f. Stripe rust established in eastern Australia inwhile a second introduction to Western Australia in had spread to the east by STRIPE RUST DISEASE CYCLE Wheat stripe rust can develop on triticale, barley, barley grass, brome grass and some other grasses, but wheat is the main host.

Wind spreads spores of stripe rust from pustules. This book comprehensively introduces stripe rust disease, its development and its integral control. Covering the biology, genetics, genome, and functional genomics of the pathogen, it also discusses host and non-host resistance, their interactions and the epidemiology of the disease.

Diseases, Distribution, Epidemiology, and Control Edited by Alan P. Roelfs and William R. Bushnell Cereal Rust Laboratory Agricultural Research Service U.S.

Department of Agriculture LEAF RUST OF WHEAT. STRIPE RUST OF WHEAT. STEM RUST OF RYE. XII. LEAF RUST OF RYE. XIII. STEM RUST OF BARLEY. XIV. LEAF RUST OF BARLEY. STEM. Wheat rust field data was obtained from farm growers during a 3 year whole field campaign of winter wheat (production cycles –, – and –).

This campaign started in autumn–winter of each production cycle. Over the last decades recurrent wheat stem and stripe rust epidemics have reduced wheat yield in Ethiopia. Ina major stripe rust epidemic occurred, affecting approximately ha (Singh et al ). More recently, in /, approximately 40 ha were infected with wheat stem rust (Olivera et al ).

Under laboratory conditions, 24 hours of leaf wetness duration was found to be adequate for the appearance of stripe rust in all the four selected wheat varieties, whereas, minimum latent period of, and days, maximum pustules size of, and mm and maximum disease severity of, and You do not have access to any existing collections.

You may create a new collection. Stripe rust, Puccinia striiformis Westend. tritici, is one of the most important diseases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) that can be found around the world.

In Canada, stripe rust was first discovered on a wild grass in Alberta, inand few years later on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and on wheat (Newton and Johnson ).

Wheat is one of the world's foremost crops where its production is growing yearly. However, the emerged virulent stripe rust races at one point of the world spread to the rest of wheat producing countries by wind as well as human travels and damaged popular resistant wheat cultivars thereby posed food insecurity.

This study was carried out with the aim to identify possible sources of stripe. Stripe rust is principally an important disease of wheat during the winter or early spring or at high elevations.

Table shows regions of the world where stripe rust has been a major or local problem. Stripe rust of wheat may be the cause of stripe rust on barley (Stubbs, ). China has the largest stripe rust epidemic region in the world in terms of wheat acreage affected by the disease.

Extensive studies on the epidemiology and management of stripe rust have been carried out since the widespread occurrence of the disease in the s. Fifteen epidemic zones were classified, based on factors influencing the occurrence of wheat stripe rust. The disease can spread. Purchase Diseases, Distribution, Epidemiology, and Control - 1st Edition.

Print Book & E-Book. ISBN  Three different rust diseases occur in wheat—stem rust, leaf rust, and stripe rust. They are named for the dry, dusty, yel­ low red or black spots and stripes (sori or pustules) that erupt.

Abstract | Wheat is the most essential food used by nearly 40% of the total population of the world. Yellow or stripe rust (produced by Puccinia striiformis), is a globally significant disease of wheat.

Stripe rust was primarily considered a disease of cooler climate (2°C - 15°C), upper altitudes and northern latitudes, but current epidemics of the disease have confronted this supposition. Causal Organism. Stripe rust is caused by the fungus Puccinia ent specialized forms, forma speciales (abbreviated f.

sp.) of this fungus occur, with f. tritici causing disease mainly on wheat, some other grasses, and rarely on contrast, Puccinia striiformis f. hordei causes disease mainly on barley and only a few varieties of wheat.

Wheat rust - stripe (yellow) Wheat provides one-fifth of the world’s food and is second only to rice as a source of calories in the developing world. While cereal production needs to increase to meet future demand, especially in the developing world, the emergence of new pathogen races (aka strains), changes in climate and rising fertiliser.

Shaner G, Powelson RL. Epidemiology of stripe rust of wheat, – Oregon Agricultural Experimental Station Bulletin. ; ; Shrum R. Progress Report. Vol. Pennsylvania: Agricultural Experiment Station; Simulation of wheat stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis West.) using EPIDEMIC, a flexible plant disease simulator.Though many biotic stresses impede wheat production, the wheat rust diseases are best known for their devastating and widespread nature.

Both stem rust and stripe rust can cause % loss, whereas leaf rust can result in 50% loss [].In India stripe rust of wheat (caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Westend., Authority) is a threat in 10 million hectares of Northern India, whereas. The fact that the present authors have collected known physiologic forms of wheat stripe rust on species of Hordeum, Elymus and Agropyron, and have shown that forms 4, 6, 8 and 13 can attack seedling plants of Hordeum, Agropyron, and Elymus species throw a doubt on the existence of the Hordei, Elymi, and Agropyri varieties created by Eriksson.